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Problems can happen at any time, day or night, so we've compiled some of the most common subjects and questions into step-by-step tutorials. Below are links to pages that deal with specific FAQ's that we recieve here at Tiger Mountain Technologies. Every topic includes step-by-step instructions on how to resolve most issues.

Basic Questions
01 What is the Internet?
02 How do people connect to the Internet?
03 What do people do while connected to the Internet?
04 What is a web browser?
05 Anatomy of Internet Explorer
06 Anatomy of Netscape Navigator
07 Anatomy of Firefox
08 What information is available online?
09 What do I need to use the Internet?
10 How do I navigate the Internet?
11 How do I search for something on the Internet?
 
Intermediate Questions
12 Tips for safer Internet browsing
13 How do I save images and download files/programs?
14 Why do some pages take so long to load?
15 How do I print a page I'm viewing?
16 How do I check my email?
17 What is a virus?
18 How do you prevent viruses from infecting your computer?
19 How do I set/change my homepage?
20 How can I filter some offensive content when I browse?
 
01- What is the Internet?
The Internet (commonly called "the web" or "the net") is a global series of public networked computers accessible to several hundred million people in which users at one computer can view information from another computer. The Internet isn't a physical place, it exists in computers and phone lines, and allows users to perform a variety of tasks. Reading an online newspaper, shopping for goods, checking travel conditions, and writing a journal are all activities users can participate in while online. "Online" means that your computer is on and you're connected to the Internet with an Internet Service Provider.
 
02- How do people connect to the Internet?
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is a company that provides access to the Internet through a variety of methods. These methods include dial-up, DSL, cable, and wireless. Dial-up is the most basic and widely used method of accessing the Internet and is performed when a computer is connected to a phone line dials a number to the ISP. DSL is a more advanced method of connecting, but instead of connecting every time you want to be online DSL is "always on." Cable connection is achieved similarly to DSL, however cable uses coaxial cable rather than a phone line to connect to the Internet; service is usually through a cable tv provider. Wireless uses radio signals sent and received between an ISP and customers to connect to the Internet.

Not only are there different methods of connecting to the Internet, but each method of connection varies in the speed at which information is sent and received. In other words, the amount of time between a page starts loading until it's finished will depend upon how fast your connection will allow data to be transferred.
 
03- What do people do while connected to the Internet?
For most Internet users electronic mail (email) has virtually replaced Postal Services to send and receive short written communications. Email is by far the most widely used application on the net. Recently technology has allowed live conversations with other Internet users is also possible in several forms: Instant Messaging, Video Chat, Chat Rooms, etc.

The most widely used part of the Internet is the World Wide Web (www), which makes use of a method of instant cross-referencing called "hypertext." Information (text and images on screen) displayed is referred to as "pages." A page is defined as all the information on your screen at one time; even if the screen must be scrolled to view information beyond the viewable area. In nearly every web site certain words or phrases appear in a different color and are usually underlined. If you were to click on one of those words or phrases, you would be transferred to another website that is relevant to that word or phrase. In addition to words and phrases other "clickable" objects include photos, images, and objects. If you move your mouse cursor over clickable areas the pointer arrow will change into a hand, indicating that you can click there to be transferred to another site.

Using the Internet you have access to millions of pages of information at any given time. Browsing web pages (also called surfing) is done with a "web browser," which include Internet Explorer, Safari, Netscape Navigator, Firefox, and Opera. The appearance of some web sites may vary slightly depending upon the type of browser you are using.
 
04- What is a web browser?
A web browser is a software program that reads the code used to build a web site and then displays the decoded web site on your monitor. Web browsers are usually pre-installed on nearly every computer, and if you're reading this right now, then you're using a web browser to do so. If you're not sure if you have a web browser on your computer, then minimize all of the windows currently open and look at your desktop for icons that may look like this:

Each web browser displays a site's information slightly differently, but for the most part pages will look the same no matter what browser you use to surf. The most popular browsers are Microsoft's Internet Explorer, Apple's Safari, Netscape Navigator, and Mozilla's Firefox. Web browsing software is 100% free for everyone to download, install, and use.

When choosing a web browser you should keep some things in mind: what operating system you're using, web page compatibility, and security vulnerabilities. Safari is compatible with Macintosh computers ONLY, Internet Explorer is the most widely compatible browser, and Firefox has very few security vulnerabilities. We recommend reading up on the different browsers, and asking technical experts before choosing a browser. If you're new to the Internet we recommend using Mozilla's Firefox for overall compatibility and tighter security.
 
05- Anatomy of Internet Explorer
This will address some of the basic anatomy of a web browser. Since web browsers are made by different software companies some features of a browser may not be part of another browser, resulting in a simpler or more complex browsing experience.

Below is www.lewiscounty.com as viewed with Internet Explorer:

  1. This is the Internet Explorer's Menu Bar. Clicking on one of these will result in a drop down menu with several new choices; options include nearly everything from saving an image to controlling how a page is displayed. For novice users it's best to use Internet Explorer's default settings.
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  2. These are the Toolbar Buttons. Clicking on these will generate different results. The green arrow pointing left will take you back to the last page you viewed. The green arrow pointing right will take you forward to the page you came from. The red x will stop a page from loading. The two small green arrows will refresh (reload) the current page you're viewing. There are several different buttons depending upon how you've configured Internet Explorer, but most perform browsing related tasks.
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  3. This area is the Address Bar. You can type in a web site's address (e.g., www.lewiscounty.com) here, and if you press "ENTER" on your keyboard your browser will go to the address you typed.
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  4. This Status Icon will animate while a page is being loaded. Different versions of Internet Explorer and different versions of your operating system will change what icon is displayed.
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  5. Beneath the Menu Bar is where the current web page will be displayed. Images, text, links, and various other visual elements will be displayed here. You navigate through the web site in this part of the web browser.
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  6. At the bottom of the web browser is the Status Bar. Here you can see what the your browser is loading (images, etc.), where a link will take you, and if there are problems displaying a page.
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  7. Part of the Status Bar is where notices will be displayed, such as security issues, and how much of the page has been loaded.
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  8. This is the Scroll Bar. This will display how much of the page is displayed. If the page is longer than what's on your screen a moveable bar will let you scroll vertically along a page's contents. Some web pages will have a scroll bar along the bottom of the page, allowing you to scroll horizontally.
 
06- Anatomy of Netscape Navigator?
This will address some of the basic anatomy of a web browser. Since web browsers are made by different software companies some features of a browser may not be part of another browser, resulting in a simpler or more complex browsing experience.

Below is www.lewiscounty.com as viewed with Netscape Navigator:

  1. This is Netscape Navigator's Menu Bar. Clicking on one of these will result in a drop down menu with several new choices; options include nearly everything from saving an image to controlling how a page is displayed. For novice users it's best to use Netscape Navigator's default settings.
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  2. This area is the Address Bar. You can type in a web site's address (e.g., www.lewiscounty.com) here, and if you press "ENTER" on your keyboard your browser will go to the address you typed.
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  3. This is the Search Button. If you type a query into the Address Bar and press this button Netscape will search the Internet for results.
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  4. This button is for Printing. If you'd like to print a web page that you're viewing, pressing this button will get you started. Pressing the small arrow next to this button will bring up a small menu that has some printing options you can explore.
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  5. This Status Icon will animate while a page is being loaded. Different versions of Netscape Navigator and different versions of your operating system will change what icon is displayed.
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  6. These are the Toolbar Buttons. Clicking on these will generate different results. The gray arrow pointing left will take you back to the last page you viewed. The gray arrow pointing right will take you forward to the page you came from. The X will stop a page from loading. The small labeled buttons will do what their description reads. There are several different buttons depending upon how you've configured Netscape Navigator, but most perform browsing related tasks.
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  7. This area is the Sidebar. From this panel you can perform searches, browse online stores that Netscape has suggested, and look up maps. Should you want to close this panel you can click on the X in the corner of the Sidebar.
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  8. Beneath the Menu Bar is where the current web page will be displayed. Images, text, links, and various other visual elements will be displayed here. You navigate through the web site in this part of the web browser.
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  9. This is the Scroll Bar. This will display how much of the page is displayed. If the page is longer than what's on your screen a moveable bar will let you scroll vertically along a page's contents. Some web pages will have a scroll bar along the bottom of the page, allowing you to scroll horizontally.
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  10. At the bottom of the web browser is the Status Bar. Here you can see what the your browser is loading (images, etc.), where a link will take you, and if there are problems displaying a page. Part of the Status Bar is where notices will be displayed, such as security issues.
 
07- Anatomy of Firefox

This will address some of the basic anatomy of a web browser. Since web browsers are made by different software companies some features of a browser may not be part of another browser, resulting in a simpler or more complex browsing experience.

Below is www.lewiscounty.com as viewed with Mozilla's Firefox:

  1. This is the Firefox's Menu Bar. Clicking on one of these will result in a drop down menu with several new choices; options include nearly everything from saving an image to controlling how a page is displayed. For novice users it's best to use Firefox's default settings.
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  2. These are the Toolbar Buttons. Clicking on these will generate different results. The green left arrow will take you to the last page you viewed. The right arrow will take you to the page you returned from. The two blue arrows refresh the page you're viewing. The little house will take you back to your home page.
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  3. This is the GO button. After you type an address into the address bar you can press this button to go to the new page.
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  4. This is the Address Bar. From here you can type in a website (eg: www.lewiscounty.com) and either click the GO button or press enter on your keyboard.
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  5. This Status Icon will animate while a page is being loaded. Different versions of Firefox and different versions of your operating system will change what icon is displayed.
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  6. Beneath the Menu Bar is where the current web page will be displayed. Images, text, links, and various other visual elements will be displayed here. You navigate through the web site in this part of the web browser.
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  7. At the bottom of the web browser is the Status Bar. Here you can see what the your browser is loading (images, etc.), where a link will take you, and if there are problems displaying a page. Part of the Status Bar is where notices will be displayed, such as security issues.
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  8. This is the Scroll Bar. This will display how much of the page is displayed. If the page is longer than what's on your screen a moveable bar will let you scroll vertically along a page's contents. Some web pages will have a scroll bar along the bottom of the page, allowing you to scroll horizontally.
 
08- What information is available online?
The amount of information online far surpasses the amount of information in any set of encyclopedias. Although encyclopedias contain information collected up to the point when published, they do not contain current or breaking events. The Internet is home to all the information found in encyclopedias, and current events. In fact, web sites that specialize in news usually change several times a day to reflect breaking news.

Local and world news can be read online, view paintings by Da Vinci, watch movie previews, you can read about historical events, learn why the sky is blue, look at someone's vacation photos, read novels, learn how to change your car's oil, and more. With programs such as MSN Messenger you can type and talk to friends or make new friends! Commerce has become a large part of the Internet, allowing users to buy or sell everything from comic books to homes. The Internet is also a great resource for daily activities such as checking email and looking up driving directions.
 
09- What do I need to use the Internet?
In simplest terms all you need is a computer and a connection. In real terms you'll need a computer: either a laptop or a desktop, and generally speaking newer is better. You'll also need a connection to the Internet with your ISP: dial-up (including an active phone line), DSL, cable, or wireless. In the end it's really up to you the user what brand of computer you use, how you connect to the Internet, and what browser you use.

With regard to computer hardware you'll need a computer, monitor, keyboard, and mouse. It should be noted that if you use a laptop your computer, monitor, keyboard, and mouse are already built in.
 
10- How do I navigate the Internet?
Navigating the Internet is pretty simple, but can be confusing at times. There are several ways to navigate the Internet, the most obvious is the Address Bar as seen below:

In the Address Bar you type in what web site you want to visit and either press the Go button or press Enter on the keyboard. When typing an address in, be sure to type in the site's exact address or you could be taken to a completely different site.

Another method of Internet navigation is via hyperlinks, or links for short. Hyperlinks are sections of text that are usually a different color than the surrounding text that when clicked on take you to a different page; they can look like this. Disreputable sites can contain blind links, which take you to a site other than what is displayed. For example, click this link: www.lewiscounty.com Even though it says "www.lewiscounty.com" it took you to "www.google.com" If you're not sure about where a link will take you, put your mouse cursor over the link but don't click. Instead look at the Status Bar at the bottom of the page to see where the link will take you.

A third way to navigate the Internet is with Favorites. Favorites are a list of web sites that you visit often and have saved in your browser's Favorites menu. In the Menu Bar click on Favorites and click Add to Favorites as seen below:
 
11- How do I search for something on the Internet?
Searching for things (nearly anything you're interested in) on the Internet is pretty easy. A Search Engine is a web site that will search for anything you tell it to. However there are several different sites that search differently, so it's up to you which search engine you use. Search engines include Google, Yahoo!, and Lycos.

To start searching, navigate to a search engine, type in your interest and click "search." Searching for multiple things or a person's name can get a little tricky. If you're searching for a name such as Thomas Jefferson you can type it like this: "Thomas Jefferson" to tell the search engine you're looking for what's exactly in the quotes rather than searching for Thomas and Jefferson. If you're searching for multiple items such as Washington lakes, try this: Washington+lakes. If you're still not finding what you're looking for try the search engine's help section for more search tips.
 
12- Tips for safer Internet browsing
Although the Internet is an amazing resource for information, the Internet can also be very dangerous. If you're new to the Internet you may want to take some time to read through these tips to help your Internet experience more enjoyable.
  1. Type the site's address in correctly. Even one wrong letter can result in your visiting a completely different web site -- sometimes even taking you to a site with objectionable material. For example www.whitehouse.gov is the official web site for The White House, where as www.whitehouse.com is an adult web site.
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  2. Be very careful about what you download from a web site. Most "free" downloads are actually carrying viruses, trojans, and spyware and other malicious programs that can damage your computer's ability to operate properly. You should only download files from reputable web sites who offer legitimate products.
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  3. Sites such as Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, Symantec, and Sony offer downloads to help your computer run more efficiently. On the other hand some reputable sites that offer downloads can inadvertently decrease your computer's performance. Examples of this include screen savers that drain your computer's resources, email programs that can create system errors, and programs that track your Internet browsing habits. For more information on this, please read our Spyware FAQ.
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  4. NEVER give your personal information (home address, phone number, Social Security Number, banking information, etc.) to anyone online. Identity theft is a crime in which the victim's personal information is stolen and crimes are committed in the victim's name. This can be avoided by NEVER giving out personal information to anyone, NEVER email your personal information, NEVER send your personal information in a chat room, NEVER enter your personal information at a disreputable web site.
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  5. If you're using a computer with the Windows operating system, then you can download free security upgrades to your computer while on the Internet. Every browser and operating system has security vulnerabilities, and Microsoft addresses these issues with security patches that users can download from their Windows Update web site.
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  6. Unfortunately there are countless tips that could be listed, but for the most part good judgment will get you a long way.
 
11- How do I save images and download files/programs?
Saving images in any browser is usually pretty easy. If you're using a computer that runs Windows then you should right click the image, and (depending on your browser) choose to save the image. If you're using an Apple computer, click and hold the image and choose to save the image. Be sure to save the images in a place where you can find them; easiest place is your desktop.

Downloading files is easy once you know how. Downloadable files are usually labelled well as either underlined links or buttons. If you left click these buttons or links the download usually begins, or you can right click the button/link and chose the "Save Target As" option. Before downloading begins you're given a choice as to where you'd like the file to be downloaded to; for quick finding the desktop is a good location.
 
14- Why do some pages take so long to load?
Some pages take longer to load than others for several reasons: the page may contain several images (images take longer to load than text), the page could contain large images, the page could be trying to load video or music, the site may contain errors (the page could look "broken"), the web site may be hosted on a slow server, or the web site might be experiencing heavier traffic than usual.

Another point to consider is that your individual connection speed (dial-up, DSL, cable, or wireless) determines how fast you're able to download pages and content. Although the vast majority of Internet users are on dial-up, many sites are designed for users with faster connections.
 
15- How do I print a page I'm viewing?
The method by which you print depends on several factors: what operating system you're using (Windows 98, Windows XP, Linux, OSX, etc.), what browser you're using (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Netscape Navigator, Opera, Safari, etc.), and what kind of printer you're connected to (Hewlett Packard, Canon, Epson, etc.).

    For most computers and browsers:
  1. Move your cursor to the Menu Bar
  2. Click on File
  3. Then choose Print
  4. Below is an example in Windows XP:



  5. You may have a Print icon in your browser's Toolbar that you could also click to print the page you're viewing. Icons vary between computers, operating systems, and browsers but usually look like a small printer.
 
16- How do I check my email?
The process by which users check their email is quite varied. Some people check their email with email programs (Outlook Express, and others), some use webmail (www.lewiscounty.com), others use instant messaging programs (MSN Messenger, AOL Instant Messenger, etc.), and several other different methods. LewisCounty.com customers can check their email on www.lewiscounty.com

For general questions about email take some time to read our Email FAQ page, and if you need help using the webmail have a look at our Webmail FAQ page.
 
17- What is a virus?
A computer virus is a malicious program that infects your computer's vital components, executes it's programming, replicates and repeats. Viruses were commonly distributed via email and email attachments that would unleash the virus on unsuspecting victims. Currently viruses are able to infect computers simply by visiting a web site that has a virus program written into the page's code. With this type of attack your computer could be infected without your knowledge.
 
18- How do you prevent viruses from infecting your computer?
Unfortunately the only way to prevent viruses from infecting your computer is to never go online, never open any media from discs, and never allow anyone else to use your computer. This method of prevention is almost impossible to enforce, and the fact is that at some point nearly every computer will have become infected with a virus.

The easiest ways to prevent viruses from infecting your computer is to stay away from dangerous web sites, don't open email/attachments from people you don't know, don't download programs carelessly, and make sure that you have the current Windows Updates.

For additional protection a firewall can prevent unwanted people from attacking your computer's vulnerabilities. Windows XP users have a firewall already installed, read how to activate it here. Firewall programs are available for purchase, so shop around for information and prices.

Antivirus programs are very popular, but only protect you from known threats. Antivirus programs can't protect you from viruses that are created tomorrow because they're unknown threats. In order for an antivirus program to be effective it has to be kept up to date (how to do that depends upon the program), and you have to scan your computer for viruses. Antivirus programs can sometimes be overzealous and overprotect you by blocking access to sites and functions you normally use. Antivirus programs vary in cost and features, so be sure to research available products before buying one.

On one hand there are some known, and popular, antivirus programs such as Norton, McAfee, and others. When you buy these programs you must also pay for a subscription to download updates, however the subsription usually expires after one year. On the other hand you can download and use a free, and respected, antivirus program from a company called Grisoft. Grisoft's antivirus program is called AVG and is free to download, use, and update pretty much forever. The most significant drawback to this is that the free version can ocasionally take a very long time to download updates, it is free after all. You can find the AVG free version here: AVG Free version.
 
19- How do I set/change my homepage?
Setting your homepage is different for each of the browsers, and this will cover Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Netscape Navigator.
    Internet Explorer Instructions:
  1. Open Internet Explorer (you don't have to be online if you know what site you want your homepage to be).
  2. In the Menu Bar click on Tools, then select Internet Options
  3. A new menu should open with a series of tabs at the top. In the highlighted space, type in the site's address and click OK. Below is a screen shot example:



  4. If you're online and at the page you want as your new homepage, just click on the Use Current button, then OK!
    Fire Fox Instructions:
  1. Open Firefox (you don't have to be online if you know what site you want your homepage to be).
  2. In the Menu Bar click on Tools, then select Options
  3. A new menu should open with a series of icons on the side. Click on the General icon and in the hilighted space, type in the site's address and click OK. Below is a screen shot example:



  4. If you're online and at the page you want as your new homepage, just click on the Use Current button, then OK!
    Netscape Navigator Instructions:
  1. Open Netscape (you don't have to be online if you know what site you want your homepgae to be).
  2. In the Menu Bar click on Edit, then select Preferences
  3. A new menu should open with a series of links on the left. Click on Navigator, and in the middle of the right section you can type in the site's address and click OK. Below is a screen shot example:



  4. If you're online and at the page you want as your new homepage, just click on the Use Current Page button, then OK!
 
20- How can I filter some offensive content when I browse?
You're probably concerned about the content that you or your children may encounter while surfing the web. Internet Explorer (version 6) helps filter content as you browse with Content Advisor, which allows you to grant or deny access to certain web sites.
    To set up Content Advisor you're going to need a password, so be sure to keep it somewhere you'll remember!
  1. Open Internet Explorer
  2. In the Menu Bar click on Tools, then Internet Options as pictured below:



  3. A new window should open up with a series of tabs at the top. Click on the Content tab, click Enable, then click Create Password as seen below:



  4. In the space provided type in the password you want to use. Avoid something easily guessed such as names of friends, pets, etc. It's best to be cryptic and use letters in conjunction with letters.
  5. In the Confirm Password Box re-type the password. If you'd like a hint (in case you forget your password) you can type a hint for yourself.
  6. Click OK and now any changes to the Content Advisor, this password will be needed.
 
Internet Is Our Business
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